Appropriate Technology to Enhance Education at Kamina Methodist University

10/28/2015

Solar batteries and projectors from United Methodist Communications and Church of the Resurrection mean students can complete term presentations in the midst of no electricity. Pictures taken by Kasongo Sebastien for United Methodist Communications.

Pictures taken by Kasongo Sebastien for United Methodist Communications

Solar batteries and projectors from United Methodist Communications and Church of the Resurrection mean students can complete term presentations in the midst of no electricity.

 
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 A computer science student presents before members of the school jury and his colleagues. Photo by Kasongo Sebastien for United Methodist Communications.

By Rev. Betty Kazadi Musau, a United Methodist clergywoman from the Democratic Republic of Congo and a public health care worker

In July 2015, United Methodist Communications conducted technology training at Kamina Methodist University in Kamina, Democratic Republic of Congo. The Rev Neelley Hicks, director of ICT4D church initiatives at United Methodist Communications, led the group. She brought in solar batteries, projectors and speakers. This equipment can be used during training when the electricity goes out, which is a common problem in the area. United Methodist Communications and the United Methodist Church of the Resurrection in Leawood, Kansas, donated the equipment used during training to the United Methodist Community Communication Center in case of power failure.

It is with joy we share that the solar batteries and projectors have served students from Kamina Methodist University during their September supplementary exams. Students from the faculty of computer science asked to use the technology for their term presentations. During the four days of presentations, a total of 112 students benefitted from appropriate technology to enhance their learning and success.

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Students work on their laptops during term presentations. Equipment was powerered by solar energy. Photo by Kasongo Sebastien for United Methodist Communications.

Faculty members were amazed to see the technology serve students in the faculty of computer science in the midst of no electricity and no generator. Students were able to connect their own computers to the solar batteries and projectors, which the community center supplied for a small fee of $1.50 per student.

This service generated $150 for the center, which was used toward the monthly incentives for three of its staff. Appropriate technology innovates and energizes students to be proactive.

*Musau is a United Methodist clergywoman from the Democratic Republic of Congo and a public health care workerFor more information, contact Neelley Hicks, Director of Information and Communications Technology Church Initiatives, at NHicks@umcom.org.